Serving Others on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is next week and, if you’re like most Americans, you’re probably going to celebrate in some fashion regardless of whether you’re at home or out on the road in your RV.

Keep in mind though that it’s one thing to give thanks and another to give others reason to be thankful. If you want to give back this Thanksgiving no matter where you are, consider taking on one or more of these tasks.

Extend an Invitation to a Neighbor

It doesn’t matter if you’re home, at an RV park, or out at a campground: if you notice a neighbor who looks lonely on Thanksgiving, see if they’d be interested in celebrating with you and your family. Adding that one extra seat at your table could make the holiday for someone.

Donate to a Local Food Bank

There are hungry folks all across the country and there are food banks that are trying to keep them fed. It would be a hopeless task if not for the continuing generosity of Americans all across the country. Giving to a food bank is a simple yet effective and direct way to help the needy this Thanksgiving.

Visit a Hospital or Retirement Home

Not everyone in a hospital or retirement home will have someone to celebrate Thanksgiving with. Some of them may not have anyone at all. Drop in at either establishment and see if they allow volunteer visitors. What may be a simple visit and conversation for you may make someone else’s month.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Stop by Leisure Time RV this fall to tour a new or used motorhome or travel trailer. Find one that’s perfect for you and your full-time aspirations. If you’re not on the market for an RV, you can still stop in at Leisure Time RV to schedule service, to learn more about RVing, or to shop for parts and accessories.

Host Thanksgiving in Your RV with These 8 Tips

Hosting a Thanksgiving get-together can be overwhelming, especially when you’re hosting it in the compact space of an RV. However, that doesn’t mean you should skip the holiday when living life on the road.

Use these simple tips for throwing the perfect Thanksgiving celebration in the comfort of your RV this year.

1. Plan Ahead

Thanksgiving’s position after Halloween and before Christmas means the holiday seems to appear out of nowhere. Decide which dishes you’ll be making ahead of time, so you can start the process of gathering all of the supplies you’ll need.

2. Start Cooking Early

You don’t have to wait until Thanksgiving Day to start the cooking process. Prepare your sides the day before Thanksgiving, so you just have to pop them in the oven when your guests arrive.

3. Try Something New

Use traveling in your RV during the holiday as a chance to try something new. Consider deep-frying your turkey outside instead of roasting it indoors.

4. Find Decorations at the Campsite

Use sticks, leaves, pine cones and pine needles from around the campsite for festive and free table decorations.

5. Consider Buying Your Desserts

Shop at a local bakery for delectable Thanksgiving desserts that your friends will love just as much as the homemade versions.

6. Create Fun Placecards

Placecards are a fun part of every festivity, but you can make them even more enjoyable by printing out funny Facebook photos of your friends instead.

7. Label Your Dishes

Make your party welcoming for your friends with dietary restrictions by labeling your dishes with their name and what’s inside.

8. Don’t Forget the Kids’ Table

Creating a fun kids’ table will ensure your little guests stay occupied, so the adults can have more fun. Cover the kids’ table with craft paper and give them plenty of crayons to decorate it as they please.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Don’t forget to stop and see us at Leisure Time RV to shop for a more comfortable and convenient RV for all of your holiday festivities.

Dutch Ovens Are an RVer’s Best Friend

When you’re loading up your RV for your next road trip, you may be tempted to pack all of your kitchen’s gadgets so that you’re not without your most prized cooking tools. The problem is, there’s probably not going to be enough room for all of them. You’ve got to keep it simple when you RV and no cooking tool is simpler than the humble dutch oven.

The dutch oven, if you’re unacquainted, is every RVer’s best friend. This heavy, flat-bottomed kettle comes with a lid, legs, and a handle. It doesn’t look like much, but having this one tool is like bringing your kitchen stove along for the ride. They excel when it comes to campfire cooking, something you’re likely to dabble in when you’re on the road.

If you’re sick and tired of frozen, processed, dehydrated, and vacuum-sealed foods, just get yourself a quality cast iron dutch oven and bring some life back to your meals on the road. The dutch oven has a long and storied history in the United States, used by such figures as explorers, pioneers, cowboys, trappers, and mountain men. You can make nearly any meal in a dutch oven that you could make in a regular oven.

The design of a dutch oven allows you to cook complete one pot meals over any open fire. The thick cast metal of a dutch oven absorbs heat, retains it, and distributes it evenly over the inside surface. They’re kind of heavy, which means that taking one on a backpacking trip would be quite difficult, but, as an RVer, you don’t have that problem. Before your next trip, do yourself a favor and acquire your own dutch oven. You’ll find it’s not just a welcome addition to your kitchen, but your best mealtime friend.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Stop by Leisure Time RV this fall to tour a new or used motorhome or travel trailer. Find one that’s perfect for you and your travel plans this fall. If you’re not on the market for an RV, you can still stop in at Leisure Time RV to schedule service, to learn more about RVing, or to shop for parts and accessories.

Celebrating Halloween in Your RV

RV travelers don’t have to miss out on the best holiday celebrations. In fact, most holidays are even more enjoyable when spent in an RV. Halloween is one of the top holidays to enjoy on the road, because many campgrounds and RV parks host Halloween parties and trick-or-treating hours.

Prepare your RV for all of the Halloween celebrations you’ll encounter on the road with these simple, do-it-yourself tricks and tips.

Hold a Pumpkin Carving Party

Some campers don’t have enough space in their RVs to carve pumpkins, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. Throw a pumpkin carving party outside of your RV on nearby picnic tables or a table of your own. Purchase the pumpkins at a farmers’ market near your destination and invite fellow campers to join in on the fun.

Decorate Your RV

You don’t have to bring tons of supplies on your journey to decorate your RV. Purchase natural decorations, like gords and colored pumpkins, from a farmers’ market at your destination. You can also make your own Halloween-themed decorations with construction paper, glue and scissors from a local craft store. Making temporary decorations is a way to get your kids or fellow travelers involved in the decorating process.

Trick-or-Treat at the Campground

Most campgrounds welcome trick-and-treaters during Halloween. Apply the same rules you would if your kids were trick-or-treating in a traditional neighborhood. Only approach motorhomes, travel trailers or campers that are decorated with their lights on.

If the campground you’re visiting doesn’t allow trick-or-treaters, explore a safe, nearby neighborhood with your little ones. A campground official can help you locate the perfect place.

Setting up a scavenger hunt for your kids at the campsite is another way to help them feel like they’re getting the trick-or-treating experience without having to venture away from the park.

Travel in Your Dream RV

Spend more time on the road this fall with a new or top-quality pre-owned RV from Leisure Time RV. Stop in and see us to find your dream RV today.

Best Camping Games for RVers

Huddling around a campfire with your friends and family is always fun, but campfire games make it even more enjoyable. These five campfire games are fun for all ages, and they don’t require any accessories, so you can play them whether you’re tent camping or at the RV park with your motorhome.

1. Name That Tune

This game is simple, and it’s even more fun if you have a musician in your group of campers. Have your musician begin playing a song or play the beginning of a song on your phone or MP3 player. The first person to guess the name of the tune wins a point, and the person with the highest number of points at the end of the game wins.

2. Telephone

Telephone is a game that always ends in a lot of laughs. Start with one person in your group and have them think of a phrase. The phrase is then whispered from one person to another around the campfire. The last person will then recite the final phrase. Hint: It is often much different than the original.

3. The No Game

The No Game is played by forbidding everyone at your campfire to say the word “no.” Campers can ask each other questions and make comments to get each other to say the word. Each person who says “no” is eliminated, and the last person standing wins.

4. Charades

Charades is a campfire game guaranteed to make you laugh. Have one person come up with a topic and attempt to act it out. The first person to guess correctly wins.

5. Pass the Ghost Story

It’s not a campfire without a ghost story. Have one player start the ghost story with one sentence then let every person in the circle add a sentence. Make it around your circle at least twice before finishing the story.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Before you hit the road this camping season, don’t forget to stop in and see us at your one-stop RV shop — Leisure Time RV. From new RVs to service, parts, and accessories, Leisure Time RV has got you covered.

Retiring to an RV

For us working stiffs, RVing is largely a vacation thing. If you’re lucky enough to work on the Internet, you can go ahead and take off and go where you like when you like, but that’s simply not a realistic option for a lot of us. The dream of RVing full time isn’t so far-fetched on any retirement plan so long as you have an idea of how you’re going to make it work, and you’re willing to make the compromises that you need to make in order to stay on the road.

Keeping the House?

One of the big decisions that homeowners will have to make regarding retirement is whether or not to keep their home. The decision of whether or not you’re comfortable relying on an RV as your one and only home is a big one, but, there are other assets that we need to reconsider, as well. We need to expand this question to cover that car that you love, the boat you take out every summer, that acre of land that you own in Arizona. Selling off your assets might allow you to live like a King on the road, but it’s a total severance from the lifestyle that you lived while working, and not everyone is up for that. Weigh your options carefully and spend some time on the road before you decide to unload every major asset you hold.

Adjusting to the Road Life

Being on the road all of the time can wear you down if you’re not ready for it. Before you decide whether or not you want to become a full time RVer in your golden years, take whatever vacation time you have and spend as much of it on the road as possible.

Repairing Your Ride

If you’re going to sell your home and live in your RV full time, then you can’t afford to rely on others to maintain your vehicle for you. Not only can repairs get expensive, but you don’t want to wait overnight in the middle of nowhere for a mechanic to come meet you. Take the time to learn how to take care of your RV on your own

Full time RVing isn’t for everyone, but if you feel that you are a true nomad at heart, then you may be ready to turn your hobby into your lifestyle.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Stop by Leisure Time RV this fall to tour a new or used motorhome or travel trailer. Find one that’s perfect for you and your full-time aspirations. If you’re not on the market for an RV, you can still stop in at Leisure Time RV to schedule service, to learn more about RVing, or to shop for parts and accessories.

Apps Every RVer Should Download Before Their Next Trip

Although long journeys through the great outdoors may make you want to turn off your smartphones and tablets for a while, you may not want to unplug just yet. A number of RV-friendly apps are available to help you with directions, finding the best campground and even enjoying a variety of stops and sites along the way. Download these apps before you fire up your RV for your next adventure, and you’ll definitely be glad you did.

Camp and RV — Campgrounds Plus

If you’re only going to spend money on one RV camping app, Campgrounds Plus should be it. For what may seem like a high $10 price tag, you will get the best camping app on the market. Not only can you locate the campgrounds, RV parks and parking lots that suit your specific RV camping needs, you can find RV-related services and maps without an internet connection.

RoadNinja

Sick of eating gas station food every time you hit the road? RoadNinja can help you locate everything from grocery stores to roadside attractions and tons more. And when you are actually seeking a gas station, RoadNinja provides the current price for gas stations near your locations, so you can travel wisely and economically every time.

GPS CoPilot

You may think you’re good-to-go with the Google or Apple Maps application that came installed on your smartphone, but it’s best to be equipped with GPS CoPilot as well. Unlike other map applications, this one can be used offline, so you can know where you’re going even when you don’t have an internet our cellphone signal. If you’re an RV traveler who likes to head off the beaten path or even into other countries, you’ll find that GPS CoPilot’s offline maps become some of your favorite travel tools.

Before You Hit the Road

Before you fire up your RV for the first road trip of spring, don’t forget to stop by Leisure Time RV. Whether you need to shop for your next RV, make some repairs on your current one, or shop for parts and accessories, Leisure Time RV can help.

RV Hacks That Will Make You One Happy Camper

Living the RV lifestyle isn’t always easy. You’re forced to give up some of the luxuries you enjoy at home for a compact home on wheels. Although, you don’t have to have a massive Class A motorhome to enjoy your life on the road. These simple RV hacks will help ensure you and your fellow travelers are all happy campers.

1. Use a Towel Rod to Hold Bathroom Products in Place

Putting all of your bathroom products away before you hit the road can be difficult to remember, and those products can also crowd your small storage spaces. Screw a towel rod to the wall and place your products between the bar and the wall. They’ll stay organized and in place when you’re cruising down the road.

2. Use a Shoe Organizer for More Storage

Shoe organizers can hang from doors, walls, and they can even be cut to hang in compact places. They’re a perfect way to ensure your clothing, cleaning products and other supplies stay organized on the road without taking up your precious storage spaces.

3. Use Glow-in-the-Dark Tape on Your Entry Steps

Entry steps can be dangerous in the dark, but entry lights can be difficult and expensive to install. Place glow-in-the-dark tape on your steps, so you and your guests can easily avoid injury.

4. Save Free Condiments

When you’re living in a brick-and-mortar-home, you probably throw free condiments away. When you’re on the road in your RV, those extra ketchup, mustard and soy sauce packets can come in handy. They take up much less space than full-size bottles and are especially handy if your RV refrigerator is small.

5. Shop for RV Supplies at Leisure Time

Our Leisure Time online parts store is the perfect place to pick up all of the RV supplies you need to enjoy your RV lifestyle. Even better, our online parts store is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so you can always find what you need when you need it.

The Top 3 Fall Foliage Spots in Oklahoma

Fall doesn’t get enough credit in the Sooner State. Milder temperatures, uncrowded roads and breathtaking fall scenery are enough to rival the hotter days of summer. Fire up your RV and cruise down to these three destinations in Oklahoma for some of the best fall foliage our country has to offer.

Talimena National Scenic Byway

The Talimena National Scenic Byway is Oklahoma’s most popular scenic drive, and fall is the best of time of year to cruise along it in your RV. The 54-mile-long route weaves through the brightly-colored trees of the Ouachita National Forest while offering breathtaking views of the tallest mountain range between the Rockies and Appalachians. Don’t forget your picnic supplies, because the Talimena State Park is an ideal place to stop and stretch your legs.

Robbers Cave State Park

Why admire the fall colors from your vehicle when you can spend days camped among them? Robbers Cave State Park, just 5 miles north of Wilburton, offers the vibrant fall colors of the Sans Bois Mountain Range. Hiking, biking, camping, repelling, fishing and snapping stunning photos are just a few of the activities you can enjoy in this scenic atmosphere. Even better, you can park your RV at one of the state park’s RV campsites and take in the sights for days.

Chickasaw National Recreation Area

The Chickasaw National Recreation Area, in southern Oklahoma, offers a breathtaking backdrop and so many outdoor activities that you’ll never want to leave. Admire the leaves as they fall along the Lake of the Arbuckles’ 36 miles of coastline or explore the park’s countless other lakes and streams. And don’t miss a trip to Turner Falls, where you’ll watch crystal clear water cascade 77 feet down into a natural pool.

Travel Throughout Oklahoma in Your RV

There’s no better way to admire Oklahoma’s fall foliage than in the comfort and convenience of an RV from Leisure Time RVs in Oklahoma City. Stop in and see us to start your new RV lifestyle today.

Fulltime RVing Tips with Your Spouse

Traveling the country in your RV with a partner is one of the most enjoyable things in the world… or one of the most frustrating! Depends on the day, really. While you might get along most of the time, there’s something about being in close proximity with another person for days, weeks, or even months without pause that can really leave you feeling like your buttons are being pushed.

RVs mean unrivaled intimacy due to the face that they’re both your means of travel and your living quarters all in one compact package. To prevent yourself from becoming tired of your partner, it’s important to practice certain habits to distance yourself when need be.

Headphones Are Everything

There’s nothing better at creating an immediate barrier between yourself and another person than a good pair of headphones. Whether you need to cool off or simply need some alone time, headphones provide it. Listen to some music you like, catch up on an audiobook or podcast, or watch some videos. After some “alone” time, you can rejoin your partner by simply pulling the earbuds out.

Have Your Own Interests

Sure you’re traveling together and doing pretty much everything else together, but you should definitely bring along some personal hobbies with you on the road. Just like practicing them at home, your hobbies allow you to have that stress relief that only comes from doing something you love on your own. Whether it’s calligraphy, photography, writing, scrapbooking, knitting, or whatever else, don’t leave your hobbies behind.

Keep Lines of Communication Open

No matter how annoyed you are or even angry, it’s crucial that you keep communication open with your partner. While the silent treatment might sound appealing, there’s no chance that fences will be mended if you don’t talk. On that note, don’t stay angry with your partner. You’re on the road with them with nowhere to go, so make the best of any situation and let go of any anger you’re harboring.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Stop by Leisure Time RV this fall to tour a new or used motorhome or travel trailer. Find one that’s perfect for you and your travel plans this fall. If you’re not on the market for an RV, you can still stop in at Leisure Time RV to schedule service, to learn more about RVing, or to shop for parts and accessories.