What You Should Know About Boondocking

RVing is the most comfortable method of road travel, bar none. Don’t be tricked, however, into thinking you only have to camp at luxurious resorts or campgrounds. If you don’t mind roughing it or getting back to nature a bit, boondocking could be for you.

Boondocking is essentially free camping out in the wild without your typical picnic tables, parking pads, and fire pits. You find a secluded place in an area of your choosing, given the area is suitable, and camp out without paying a dime.

Sounds too good to be true, doesn’t it? We should mention that there are some caveats to keep in mind, mostly to do with a lack of creature comforts that you might be used to if you only park your RV at parks.

It’s not for everyone, but for those who have experience or want a different sort of family vacation, why not try it out? There are a good few websites that have information on places to go and sights to see. But before you head off and try your hand at this, there are a few tips and rules that can aid you in your quest.

First, make sure you keep three things in mind when looking for a spot to boondock: make sure that there is enough turn around space, that the ground is firm, and that you can access the area with no issues. There’s no sense in getting stuck just trying to find a good place to camp for free.

Next, you want to keep a few terms in mind when hunting down that perfect area. If you’re using a website to help you, you might come across BLM or WMA. If you are new to camping and aren’t sure, here’s what they mean.

BLM is the Bureau of Land Management. This is usually owned by the government and 1/8 of the total amount of land in the US is owned by them. They do lease out areas to companies but you are welcome to squat on the land for up to 14 days given there are no signs posted to the contrary.

WMA is the Wildlife Management Area and rules vary from state to state on where and how long you can camp. These lands are usually for hunting and fishing.

NPS is the National Park Service and they manage all 58 national parks in the United States. Boondocking is not allowed in these areas, however.

USFS stands for the United States Forest Service and free camping is permitted up to 14 days.

Remember that no matter where you go, leave things as you found them. Use the “Leave No Trace” rule and be respectful of your surroundings while out in your RV.

Visit Leisure Time RV

Stop by Leisure Time RV this fall to tour a new or used motorhome or travel trailer. Find one that’s perfect for your boondocking adventures. If you’re not on the market for an RV, you can still stop in at Leisure Time RV to schedule service, to learn more about RVing, or to shop for parts and accessories.

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